Scottish Psalmody: Common Metre Tunes

The tunes on this page are those found in the book “The Scottish Psalmody”, as published by the Free Church of Scotland in tonic sol-fa in a major revision in 1977, with various reprints since, the most recent being a 2013 printing by the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing) from the FCoS staff music edition which had first been issued in 1992. The recordings are chosen according to my personal preference of singing style rather than because the singing was taken from a particular book – hence some are actually recordings of singing from Sing Psalms (the complete version of which was published 2003 by the Free Church of Scotland).

MISSING: Melodious and preferably group or congregational recordings of the following tunes in the form printed in the Scottish Psalmody:
Artaxerxes, Balfour, Bedford, Eatington, Haresfield, Liverpool, Lyra, Orphans, Stockton.
I need them to be online (rather than on a CD) so I can link to them, and ideally they should state what group was singing.


  • 20: Abbey (tune 23 in Sing Psalms, 24 in Scottish Psalter 1929) .  One of the “twelve tunes” issued in Aberdeen in 1666 to accompany the 1650 Scottish Psalter (which had been issued without music).
    Psalm 126 (Sing Psalms).  A nice recording apparently by a large group/congregation, this may once have been on the Free Church’s website, but this particular copy is on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Other slower recordings:
    Psalm 4 (Scottish Psalter).  From Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Psalm 119: 113-120 (Scottish Psalter).  From Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 21: Arden (tune 25 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 54 (Scottish Psalter).  A recording of the melody and harmony from John-Ross10’s Soundcloud profile.  This is the only recording of psalm singing to this tune that I found.
    This is one of just 11 tunes that are listed on the Acknowledgements page in The Scottish Psalmody as being under copyright. The tune was originally set to “O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing” in the BBC Hymn Book – and a two verse sample of this can be heard at a page for the Naxos CD “A Choral Wedding”.
    Update (Sept 2015):
    Psalm 19:1-8, congregational singing with a shaky start but getting a lot better by the end, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (uploaded to YouTube in April 2015).  And another, Psalm 18:42-45.

  • 22: Argyle (tune 26 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 27: 4-8 (Sing Psalms).  A nice recording of congregational singing from Dowanvale Free Church, uploaded by David Murray; given first place in my listing because some other recordings are particularly slow or nasal.
    Niallags, in his (non-congregational) recording using the words of Psalm 74: 12-17 (Scottish Psalter), notes that he has used Isobel Gordon’s revised harmony as printed in Sing Psalms. The melody is identical in the Scottish Psalmody, but not the harmony – in the Scottish Psalmody it appears that two of the voices didn’t sing the third line at all, and a number of other changes have also been made.

  • 23: Arnold (not in Sing Psalms, 25 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 21: 1-5 (Scottish Psalter), as printed in the post-1977 Scottish Psalmody and Scottish Psalter 1929;  congregational or perhaps more likely choral recording found on onnor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile
    Psalm 21: 1-5 (Scottish Psalter), from the 1976 Glasgow Psalmody Recital tape “Joy in Psalms” – this is how the tune is widely sung in Scotland, with an extra note at the end of the second line. 

  • 24: Artaxerxes (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929); also known as Arlington
    As at June 2015 I have not found any congregational or group singing of this tune in the form used in the Scottish Psalmody.
    Psalm 17: 1-6 (Scottish Psalter) is a slightly speeded up version of a recording by Niallags of the harmony parts of this tune.
    In addition the following instrumental/electronic music files are useful:
    Four part harmony using imitation vocal sound from Psalmsingers.com (Sulzmann family, Presbyterian Reformed Church, Charlotte, NC);
    Individual parts and harmony (keyboard) from Greenville Presbyterian Church, Greenville, SC – a congregation of the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing).

  • 25: Ayrshire (27 in Sing Psalms; too recent to be in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    One of the 11 tunes listed on the Acknowledgements page in The Scottish Psalmody as being under copyright.
    There are a number of recordings of singing to this tune online – maybe it’s one that’s better participated in than listened to, as I had difficulty coming up with a clear favourite.
    Here are two:
    Psalm 4 (Sing Psalms), uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile
    Psalm 40:1-5 (Scottish Psalter) – despite being slow and somewhat disjointed, a mix of children’s voices (often not in time) and some nice harmony, make this sound more alive and less heavy than some more professional recordings. From a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, TX.

  • 26: Babel’s Steams (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This tune is derived from “Dunlap’s Creek” and seems to bear no relation to the tune of the same name and metre in the “Southern Harmony” (also sung in the Sacred Harp tradition).
    I have found three recordings of the Scottish tune:
    Psalm 73: 18, 19, 23, 24 (Scottish Psalter) from Glasgow Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland – the only congregational recording I found
    Psalm 137 (Scottish Psalter) on RoofM’s Soundcloud profile – just a recording of a small group of young people singing – the first few words of which are obscured
    Psalm 137 (Scottish Psalter) a pleasant recording in four parts by John-Ross 10
    For comparison, here is a nice recording of Dunlap’s Creek with the same wording of Psalm 137 sung by the congregation of Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 27: Balfour (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    I cannot find any online recordings of anyone singing anything to this tune, once known as Birse.  It seems to have become associated, perhaps in the 20th century, with John Milton’s metrical psalm “The Lord will Come and Not Be Slow”, though written as a Scottish psalm tune in the late 18th century.
    There are midi files at Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen and several hymn sites; and this organ piece from Small Church Music (with a musical introduction – a bit confusing for those of us who are not used to those).
    Although this is an old tune, the particular arrangement printed in the Scottish Psalmody is listed on the Acknowledgements page as being under copyright.

  • 28: Ballerma (28 in Sing Psalms; 27 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 119: 129-136 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Others here, including Psalm 40 which is traditionally sung to this tune.

  • 29: Bangor (29 in Sing Psalms; 28 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 22: 1-10 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas. – this church also has several other psalm recordings to this tune – I have not listened to them.
    Psalm 22: 1-8 recorded in harmony by Niallags.

  • 30: Barrow (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 44:16-26 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Psalm 48: 8-14 from John-Ross10 on Soundcloud.

  • 31: Bedford (31 in Sing Psalms, 29 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    I have found no recordings of singing of the version of this tune printed in the Scottish Psalmody.  There is a midi file of vocal sounds at Psalmsingers.com – Tunes used in “The Supplement” compiled by the late Jay Sulzmann of the Presbyterian Reformed Church, Charlotte, NC.
    There are recordings of a slightly different version (perhaps taken from a Reformed Presbyterian psalter) at CCRPC Wylie.

  • 32: Belgrave (not in Sing Psalms, 30 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 85:8-13 from Greenville Presbyterian Church, South Carolina (congregational, rather subdued)
    Psalm 122 from Puritan Evangelical Church of America, San Diego, California (single voice, more upbeat)
    Psalter.org from Crown & Covenant has a good voice-friendly MIDI file from which to learn to sing this.

  • 33: Belmont (32 in Sing Psalms, 31 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 119: 57-64 (Part 8) – good depth and variety of voices, from a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, TX.
    Psalm 119: 29-32 (Part 4), uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 34: Bishopthorpe (34 in Sing Psalms, 32 in Scottish Psalter 1929) – note that the start of some of the lines in the “Comprehensive Psalter” (compare this from 1883) is much simplified from the Scottish Psalter/Scottish Psalmody version to the point of being  unrecognisable until half way through the first line.  If I remember aright, I previously looked this up online and found the Scottish version to be basically the same as the original.
    Psalm 133 (Sing Psalms) from Dowanvale Free Church
    Psalm 66:3-5, probably from a Free Church psalmody recital, uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile with permission.

  • 35: Blackbourn (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Blackbourn seems to be a speciality of Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina.  They have recordings of several psalms sung to it, and I have found no other church that has any.
    Psalm 18:14-19 is one of the more confident recordings to this tune from GPC.
    Psalm 60:1-6 from John-Ross 10 on Soundcloud.
    A good midi file of the melody from North Uist and Grimsay FCC.
    O Lord, and Master of us all (hymn) sung by a single clear voice on Basil Hoddinott’s Modern Church Music site.  Hymn tune name spelled Blackbourne.

  • 36: Bloxham (35 in Sing Psalms, 33 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 119:97-104 , a lovely slow harmonised recording from a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.
    Psalm 97 – congregational singing from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 37: Bristol (not in Sing Psalms, 34 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Two sung recordings found, both from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas:
    Psalm 36:1-7
    Psalm 119:137-144

  • 38: Caithness (37 in Sing Psalms, 37 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 28: 6-9, from Greenville Presbyterian Church .

  • 39: Caroline (38 in Sing Psalms, 38 in Scottish Psalter 1929 – in a different form)
    Psalm 130 , a beautiful recording of this uncommon repeating tune on Connor Quigley’s SoundCloud profile, but stated to be from Free Church Continuing website http://sing-the-psalms.webs.com/ where an excellent series of “Worthy to be Praised” psalmody CDs is for sale.
    Composed by Hugh Wilson (1764-1824), the author of “Martyrdom”, by 1891 “Caroline” was stated to be “not now in use”.  It appears in another form in the New Scottish Psalter (1869) .

  • 40: Cheshire (39 in Sing Psalms, 39 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 13, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church in Wylie, Texas.
    Midi at Hymntime.
    Lord, it belongs not to my care (hymn) sung by a single clear voice on Basil Hoddinott’s Modern Church Music site (select the “band” MP3 for less background music parts) .

  • 41: Colchester (40 in Sing Psalms, 41 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 46:7-11, a lovely slow harmonised recording from a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.
    Psalm 60:9-12 from Greenville Presbyterian (a US congregation attached to the Free Church of Scotland – Continuing)
    This is a personal favourite of mine, and I prefer a good speed and a melodious tone; to me this tune suggests joyfully swinging one of my children through the air!  An impression of what I’m getting at can be gained from this recording of Tate & Brady’s Psalm 122, though it’s a different version of the tune and I don’t sing quite that fast.

  • 42: Coleshill (41 in Sing Psalms, 42 – slightly differently timed – in Scottish Psalter 1929); not the American psalm tune related to Dundee/Windsor.
    The Scottish recordings I found (for instance Psalm 94: 7-12 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile) use a more expanded version than that printed in the post 1977 Scottish Psalmody.
    Psalm 94: 1-10 is from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 43: Consolation (not in Sing Psalms, 43 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 31: 1-5, uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, thought to be from the RPCI Northern Presbytery Choir
    Psalm 116:11-19, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church in Wylie, Texas.

  • 44: Contemplation (42 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 67 (Common Metre version), Track 25 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 2 – highly recommended, though not all the versions of tunes coincide with the Scottish ones.  These CDs have clear, melodious singing – clear enough to listen to in a car that doesn’t have a great deal of soundproofing.  Nowadays all the MP3s are online so you can download them without charge.
    Psalm 71:1-5, from Greenville Presbyterian Church, South Carolina.

  • 45: Crediton (44 in Sing Psalms, 46 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 19:1-6, from a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.

  • 46: Crimond (45 in Sing Psalms, 47 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Where does one start, with the best known psalm tune, though by no means the oldest?  For no particular reason
    Psalm 23, from the Brisbane youth group of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church of Australia (at least the Australians won’t feel completely left out of this page, even if it took 27 tunes before they got a look in!).
    Psalm 23, from Partick Free Church, on a coach trip.
    There are other Psalms to which the tune is set in the Scottish Psalmody, for instance Psalm 4.
    Psalm 59:1-9, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church in Wylie, Texas.

  • 47: Culross (46 in Sing Psalms, 48 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 79:9-13, Track 7 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 1
    Psalm 94:11-23, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church in Wylie, Texas.

  • 48: Cunningham (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This is a tune most of us in Scotland tend to sing with extra notes (not printed in the book, at least the current post-1977 one).
    Psalm 116:13-19, from Greenville Presbyterian, as printed!
    Psalm 116:13-19, as sung typically in Scotland (you might get even more “grace notes” than this).

  • 49: Denfield (47 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929) – evidently this is identical or near identical to the hymn tune Azmon, not to be confused with a South American river or an online retailer!
    Psalm 126, uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 150, FP (Scotland) Psalmody group, Texas.

  • 50: Dundee (Windsor) (48 in Sing Psalms, 51 in Scottish Psalter 1929) – one of the “twelve tunes” issued in Aberdeen in 1666 to accompany the 1650 Scottish Psalter (which had been issued without music).
    (not to be confused with French, which also goes under the name Dundee)
    Psalm 38:10-15, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie Texas.
    Midi at Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen.

  • 51: Dunfermline (49 in Sing Psalms, 52 in Scottish Psalter 1929)  – one of the “twelve tunes” issued in Aberdeen in 1666 to accompany the 1650 Scottish Psalter (which had been issued without music).
    Psalm 89:1-6, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 65: 1-5, a Free Church of Scotland recording, disappeared from the FC site but still at ScottishPsalter.com

  • 52: Durham (not in Sing Psalms, 53 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 27:1-6, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Midi at Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen.

  • 53: Eastgate  (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 133, from Highland Harmony Singers – there are several other recordings of this tune on various sites, all to the same psalm.

  • 54: Eatington (50 in Sing Psalms, 54 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    I had difficulty finding sung recordings for this one.
    Music audio of individual parts and combined at Greenville Presbyterian Church (FCC).
    The Church Triumphant in Thy Love (Charles Wesley hymn), sung by Wakefield Cathedral Choir.  I can’t guarantee that this is identical in every detail.

  • 55: Eden (not in Sing Psalms, 55 in Scottish Psalter 1929).  Also called St Nicholas, but under that name apparently has different timing.
    Psalm 115: 1-11, recording in four parts by John-Ross 10.
    Psalm 3, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 56: Effingham (51 in Sing Psalms, 56 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This tune is particularly well known in Scotland for being sung to the last part of Psalm 72.  There are numerous recordings of this online but few begin to capture the energy, joy and triumph with which it is sung in some Highland congregations towards the end of a “communion season” – these take different formats in different denominations so the service in which the psalm appears will vary from place to place, but it is always after the actual celebration of the Lord’s Supper has taken place, for instance in the Free Presbyterian Church it may be in the Monday “Thanksgiving” service, whereas examples from Cross Free Church, Ness are at the end of the actual Sabbath morning service for the Lord’s Supper.  The following are my personal favourites from what I’ve found online
    Psalm 72: 17-19, Highland Harmony singers along with a congregation.
    Psalm 72: 11-19, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 57: Elgin (not in Sing Psalms, 57 in Scottish Psalter 1929)  – one of the “twelve tunes” issued in Aberdeen in 1666 to accompany the 1650 Scottish Psalter (which had been issued without music).  Like most of these tunes (except Dunfermline, French, and London New), Elgin is no longer well known in Scotland.
    Psalm 35: 1-7 , recording in four parts by John-Ross 10.
    Psalm 129 , from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.  This recording has different timing, with all the notes the same length, as far as my untrained ear can make out – what the Dutch call “niet-ritmisch”, but in this case achieving more “rhythm” than some slower examples from elsewhere sung from the version printed in the Scottish Psalmody.

  • 58: Ericstane (52 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 118: 17-21, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 59: Evan (53 in Sing Psalms, 58 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 89: 24-26, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 80: 1-4, from a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.

     

  • 60: Farningham (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 56:1-8, recording in four parts by John-Ross 10.
    Psalm 42: 1-5, from a Psalmody group run by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.  Yes, there’s a child in it who is somehow singing separately from from the rest of the people present, but I feel that being able to hear the child’s voice adds to the beauty of the recording.
    Psalm 73:21-28, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 61: Farrant (54 in Sing Psalms, 59 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 12 , Track 20 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 2
    This timing, along with the example in Psalm 27: 7-14 from CCRPC, Wylie TX, is presumably taken respectively from the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland edition of the 1650 psalter and the Comprehensive Psalter (neither of which I own and both of which are out of print).  It coincides with many (though not all) of the hymn book scans displayed at Hymnary.org
    As for the timing in the Scottish Psalmody/Scottish Psalter 1929, here are two examples, neither of which makes me eager to learn to sing it as printed (I may be biased, having heard the Des Moines CD lots of times but perhaps never heard the tune sung in Scotland):
    Psalm 7:1-6 from John-Ross 10
    Psalm 90:14-17 from Greenville Presbyterian Church, South Carolina (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing)

  • 62: Felix (not in Sing Psalms, 60 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    I thought I knew of this tune, but having heard the available recordings I’m pretty sure I have in fact never heard it before!  What a pity!
    To whet your curiosity, you could start with the Texas FP psalm sing, with their usual multiple melodious voices in different parts, with children’s voices not necessarily entirely in time: Psalm 14
    More orderly and a bit plainer is the congregational singing of Psalm 37: 1-9 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX
    And for an Isle of Lewis take on the tune, here is John-Ross 10 and co. : Psalm 58:1-6

  • 63: Free Church (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 122, a Scottish congregational recording uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile
    Psalm 21:1-6, from a Texas FP psalm sing
    Psalm 18:35-41, from Greenville, South Carolina

  • 64: French (55 in Sing Psalms, 61 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Also known as Dundee – but a different Dundee appears as tune number 50.
    Psalm 121, probably from an old Free Church psalmody recital (on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile)
    Psalm 121, from Dowanvale Free Church
    Psalm 91:1-8, from CCRPC, Wylie TX, possibly sung from a version with different timing to that printed in Scottish Psalmody.   I suspect Scottish congregations often don’t sing it with the printed timing either, but this doesn’t sound quite the same as either the printed or traditional Scottish versions.

  • 65: Gainsborough (56 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Attributed to Isaac Smith but also known as St Martin and attributed to Tans’ur (e.g https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY6W12Z1DNA)
    In Scotland often sung differently to the printed version (e.g. recordings of Psalms 95 and 98 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile).
    Some examples that appear to follow the current Scottish Psalmody:
    Psalm 95:1-7 by John-Ross 10 and co.
    Psalm 47 by Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 66: Glasgow (57 in Sing Psalms, 62 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 96:1-7, from the 1976 Glasgow Psalmody Recital tape “Joy in Psalms” complete with almost psychedelic cover!
    Psalm 95, from John Ross-10 but in this case not a small group but a precentor and congregation.
    Psalm 106:43-48, from CCRPC in Wylie, Texas.

  • 67: Glencairn (58 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    T L Hately composed this in 1850 for Psalm 42 while precenter of the Free High Church, Edinburgh under the ministry of Dr Gordon.  Psalm 42 was a favourite Psalm of Dr Gordon, who was born in Glencairn.
    Psalm 42:1-5, from John Ross-10’s Soundcloud
    Interactive sheet music for Glencairn/Psalm 42 (all 4 parts together and separately) from Ruairidh Maclean’s Sailm blog.

  • 68: Glenluce (59 in Sing Psalms, 63 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 10, uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud, perhaps from an old Free Church recording.
    Psalm 42: 6-11, from a psalm-sing organised by Free Presbyterians in Texas.
    Psalm 10, from John Ross-10 and co.

  • 69: Gloucester (60 in Sing Psalms, 64 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 9: 1-9, from John Ross-10
    The only other examples I found were from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX, but both the timing and some of the notes seem to be different so presumably theirs comes from a different book – I suspect they use The Comprehensive Psalter and that this is based on the old Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland book (both are out of print as far as I know).

  • 70: Gräfenberg (61 in Sing Psalms, 65 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 15,  uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud, perhaps from an old Free Church recording.
    Psalm 119:105-112, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 71: Hamilton (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 84 from Niallags is the only recording of this repeating tune that I can find online.
    Psalm 146: 1-6 was on the 1974 Free Church Psalmody recital tape and this recording is included in the compilation CD “Performed in Heaven” but I cannot find it online.

  • 72: Haresfield (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This 20th century tune by Sir John Dykes-Bower does not appear to have been a successful introduction.  It is listed on the Acknowledgements page in The Scottish Psalmody as being under copyright.  I can find no recordings of it online, though a recording of Psalm 19 does appear on the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing)’s Worthy to Be Praised Vol 3 CD (which may no longer be available).
    Midi at Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen site
    Organ version at Deezer

  • 73: Harington (62 in Sing Psalms, 66 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This tune, the standard tune for Psalm 84, is not generally sung in the Scottish Highlands quite as printed.  The first syllable of the third and fourth line is usually sung as only one note – rather than two as printed, and the fourth syllable of the fourth line is sung with three notes (in a similar way to the corresponding syllable on the third line) rather than four as printed.  Interestingly, these flourishes are only in the melody (Soprano/Treble) line.
    Psalm 84:1-2, 10-12 (on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, perhaps from an old Free Church recital) shows how we tend to sing it here in Scotland.
    Psalm 84: 1-6 from John Ross-10 is done from the printed version, as is the congregational recording of Psalm 84 from CCRPC in Texas.

  • 74: Hermon (not in Sing Psalms. 69 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    An old tune by Jeremiah Clarke, of which I can only find one recording
    Psalm 26: 1-8 from John Ross-10
    Midi from Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen.

  • 75: Howard (63 in Sing Psalms, 70 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 62: 5-8 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, perhaps from an old Free Church recital.
    Psalm 62 v 1-6 – Howard [1650 SP] (CM) from John Ross-10.

  • 76: Huddersfield (64 in Sing Psalms, 71 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 98:1-4
    , from a psalm-sing organised by Free Presbyterians in Texas.
    Psalm 147, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, perhaps from an old Free Church recital.

  • 77: Irish (65 in Sing Psalms, 73 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 33: 1-6, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (a US congregation attached to the Free Church of Scotland – Continuing)

  • 78: Jackson (66 in Sing Psalms, 74 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 118: 24-29 , from Greenville Presbyterian Church, South Carolina.

  • 79: Kilmarnock (67 in Sing Psalms, 75 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 103: 4-12 , uploaded to Niallags’ Soundcloud profile; typical of the Highland sound of this psalm, often sung during communion services – but this recording avoids adding an extra note at the end of line 3.
    Psalm 51: 8-13 , on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 80: Lancaster (not in Sing Psalms, 78 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 69:30-36, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Psalm 44: 1-8,  from John Ross-10 and co.

  • 81: Liverpool (not in Sing Psalms, 81 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Not much available for this one.
    Psalm 24: 1-6, from Greenville FCC is a brave attempt at a virtually unknown tune which has rather a lot of notes – but I’m not sure I’d want to try and learn the tune from this recording.  As at November 2015 I can’t find any other sung recordings of this tune to psalm or hymn anywhere.
    Midi from Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen is perhaps a better guide.

  • 82: London New (70 in Sing Psalms, 82 in Scottish Psalter 1929); also known as New London
    Psalm 36:6-10, from the 1976 Glasgow Psalmody Recital tape “Joy in Psalms”.
    Psalm 103:1-5, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 83: Lyra (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    I have found no sung recordings of this 19th century American hymn tune by George Frederick Root , though it is known and sung in parts of the Scottish Highlands.
    Individual parts and harmony (keyboard) from Greenville Presbyterian Church, Greenville, SC – a congregation of the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing).

  • 84: Manchester (not in Sing Psalms, 83 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 98:4-9, from Greenville Presbyterian Church
    The earth, O Lord, is one great field (hymn) sung by a single clear voice on Basil Hoddinott’s Modern Church Music site.

  • 85: Martyrdom (71 in Sing Psalms, 84/85 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    One would be unlikely to hear this sung in the Scottish Highlands exactly as printed here – the third syllable of the second line normally has two notes.
    First some typical Scottish examples:
    Psalm 118:24-29, from Dowanvale Free Church.
    Psalm 130, from a congregation of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland.
    And as printed:
    Psalm 130, from John Ross-10 and co.

  • 86: Martyrs (72 in Sing Psalms, 86 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 43:1-5, from Greenville Presbyterian Church.
    Psalm 76, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 87: Milton (not in Sing Psalms, 88 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Very few recordings found using this tune – Connor Quigley has uploaded two, both with female voices predominant, and with the first about twice as fast as I would expect – men have difficulty in singing effectively at this speed!
    Psalm 106: 1-5 (Scottish Psalter).
    Psalm 100 (a nice recording using words from The Psalms for Singing – a 21st Century Edition – published by the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland).

  • 88: Montrose (75 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 47 from John Ross-10 and co
    Note: as printed the second note of line 4 is three times the length of the third note – this can just about be picked up from Psalm 68 : 7-1 on Worthy To Be Praised Volume 10 (CD, recording not online), and definitely from the parts tutoring on CD 2 of that volume. Not sure whether the online Psalm 47 recording picks that up, and I certainly wasn’t aware of it until I listened to some Midi files such as those from Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen, Greenville Presbyterian, and Small Church Music.

  • 89: Moravia (76 in Sing Psalms, 89 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 19:9-13 from John Ross-10 and co
    Psalm 40: 8-17 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 90: Morven (77 in Sing Psalms, 90 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 80: 14-19 from Niallags

  • 91: Naomi (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 85:1-5 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 74: 18-23 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 92: New Lydia (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929) (a repeating tune normally called Lydia in hymnbooks, and sung to “O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing”)
    Psalm 149:1-4, from John-Ross 10 and co.

  • 93: Newington (79 in Sing Psalms, 92 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 89: 15-18 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, perhaps from an old Free Church recital.

  • 94: Notting Hill (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 42:8-11 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 95: Orlington (a repeating tune, 203 in Sing Psalms, 93 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 92: 12-15 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, perhaps from an old Free Church recital.

  • 96: Orphan’s (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    The most helpful rendition I have found of this is the keyboard parts on the “Scottish Psalmody” Soundcloud profile, which probably ought to have featured more on my page, at least in relation to some of the more obscure and difficult tunes:
    Four Parts
    Alto
    Tenor
    Bass

  • 97: Paisley (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 52: 1-4; 7-9 from John Ross-10 and co
    Four part keyboard (other parts also available: Bass, Tenor, Alto )

  • 98: Palestrina (not in Sing Psalms, 94 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 119: 1-6 on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, used with permission of the RPCI Northern Presbytery Choir
    Psalm 119 Part 21 – words from The Psalms for Singing: A 21st Century Edition (RPCI)

  • 99: Peckham (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 55: 16-23 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Four part keyboard from Greenville Presbyterian Church.

  • 100: Pembroke (a repeating tune – not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 93, believed to be from the tape Scottish Metrical Psalms RP SC 4 by the RPCI Northern Presbytery Choir.
    Psalm 68:18-26 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Psalm 47:1-9  from Greenville Presbyterian Church.

  • 101: Praetorius (80 in Sing Psalms, 96 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 45:1-7 (Common Metre version), Track 25 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 1
    Psalm 22: 22-31 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 102: Rest (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 116: 1-6 from JR and Stephen on Soundcloud
    Psalm 17:1-7 from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 103: Richmond (81 in Sing Psalms, 97 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 8, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 119:153-160, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 104: St Agnes, Durham (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 119: 41-45, an older choir recording uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud page.
    Psalm 90:8-10, from a psalm-sing organised by folk from the Santa Fe, Texas, congregation of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland.

  • 105: St Andrew (82 in Sing Psalms, 99 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Connor Quigley has uploaded recordings of congregational (primarily unison) singing to this tune, with a typically Highland sound.  An example:
    Psalm 122
    He also has a harmony recording including the rather different notes sung by one or more female singers of the Alto part from The Scottish Psalmody:
    Psalm 116: 15-19  – this is totally unfamiliar to me from my experience here in the Scottish Highlands.
    And for a Texan take on the unison version:
    Psalm 25: 8-14, congregational singing from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 106: St Anne (83 in Sing Psalms, 100 in Scottish Psalter 1929) – note that the long notes at beginning and end of each line in these books are rarely sung as printed, at least here in the Scottish Highlands.  I can’t find any recordings with them either, though there is a midi at Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen.
    Psalm 86: 9-13, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile, used with permission of the RPCI Northern Presbytery Choir.
    Psalm 90: 1-9, congregational singing from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 107: St Bernard (84 in Sing Psalms, 101 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 85: 1-13, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 108: St Botolph (85 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    One of the 11 tunes listed on the Acknowledgements page in The Scottish Psalmody as being under copyright.
    Psalm 27: 7-10, choir recording on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile
    Psalm 2: 1-6, from Greenville Presbyterian Church.
    Psalm 3, from John Ross-10 and co.

  • 109: St Columba (Erin) (86 in Sing Psalms, 102in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 23, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 139: 1-10, congregational recording on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 110: St David (87 in Sing Psalms, 103 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 31:1-10, congregational singing from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    By contrast, some verses from Psalm 18 (in English) sung by a small group of young people singing one of a number of traditional Scottish Highland variations on the tune inspired by the Gaelic tradition
    And a 1977 “lined-out” recording, in Scottish Gaelic (a Celtic language), of the first three verses of Psalm 40 from the School of Scottish Studies collection.

  • 111: St Etheldreda (88 in Sing Psalms, 104 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 34:11-18, Track 18 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 2
    Psalm 119: 73-80, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Psalm 119: 105-112, from Greenville Presbyterian Church.

  • 112: St Flavian (89 in Sing Psalms, 105 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 53, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Psalm 105: 1-7, Track 6 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 2
    Psalm 106:48 (from 1959/1976 CRC Psalter Hymnal), Singing by the congregation of Grace Reformed Church (URCNA), Dunnville, Ontario.

  • 113:  St Fulbert (90 in Sing Psalms, 107 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    I learned this tune to the early verses of the Scottish Psalter’s Psalm 95 which were often sung from Christian Hymns as an “introit” at the beginning of the morning service at one of the churches I attended while at college.
    Psalm 112: 1-5, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    “Ye Choirs of New Jerusalem” (hymn), from the choir of Temple Church, London (Church of England).  I’ve include this because I feel it catches a more melodious tone than any psalm recordings I’ve found.

  • 114: St Gregory (91 in Sing Psalms, 109 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 87, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 115:  St James (92 in Sing Psalms, 110 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 54, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Midi at, for instance, http://psalmsingers.com/all-tunes-in-the-supplement

  • 116: St Kilda (93 in Sing Psalms, 111 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 51: 2,3, 7-10, recorded at Reformed Presbyterian Young Adults Weekend 2015
    Psalm 120 from The Psalms for Singing, a 21st Century edition
    (both uploaded to Soundcloud by Connor Quigley)

  • 117: St Lawrence (not in Sing Psalms, 112 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 31: 21-24, congregational recording on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 72: 1-8, harmony recording from a psalm-sing organised by folk from the Santa Fe, Texas, congregation of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland.

  • 118: St Leonard (94 in Sing Psalms, 113 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 71: 14-17
    Psalm 69: 30 & 33-36
    (both uploaded to Soundcloud by Connor Quigley)

  • 119: St Magnus (Nottingham) (95 in Sing Psalms, 114 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    From Soundcloud I see that this Jeremiah Clark tune is well known in the brass band scene – you learn something new every day!
    Psalm 24:7-10, Track 5 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 1
    Psalm 11:1-7, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina.

  • 120: St Mary (86 in Sing Psalms, 115 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 22: 1-6, from John Ross-10 and co.
    Psalm 22:1-6, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina.

  • 121: St Matthias (Song 67) (not in Sing Psalms, 116 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 78: 38-48, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    There is also a professional sung recording of this Orlando Gibbons tune on the Naxos CD “Gibbons – Hymns and Songs of the Church” – link includes a complete sample verse.

  • 122: St Minver (97 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 30: 1-7, from John Ross-10 and co.
    Psalm 78:30-37, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 123 : St Neot (not in Sing Psalms, 118 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 53: 2-6, from John Ross-10 and co.
    Psalm 25 (2nd): 15-22, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.

  • 124: St Paul (98 in Sing Psalms, 120 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 119: 9-14, a Scottish congregation at Psalm Singing Online.
    Psalm 103: 8-13, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 125: St Peter (99 in Sing Psalms, 121 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 1, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    This tune has become associated with the John Newton hymn “How Sweet the Name of Jesus Sounds” (the hymn predating the tune by over half a century) and there are many recordings of this available online.

  • 126: St Stephen (Abridge) (100 in Sing Psalms, 122 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 111, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 16: 7-11, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina.

  • 127: St Thomas (not in Sing Psalms, 123 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 26: 1-7, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 14: 3-7, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 128: Salzburg (102 in Sing Psalms, 125 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 32: 1-6, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie TX.
    Psalm 22: 14-20, from Point Free Church, Isle of Lewis
    And two small groups of young people from Scotland singing the same psalm, the first predominantly female and the second predominantly male
    Psalm 61: 1-4, on RoofM’s Soundcloud profile
    Psalm 61: 1, 4, on J-R 10’s Soundcloud profile

  • 129: Sawley (not in Sing Psalms or Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This tune is known in some Scottish congregations, but not all – some 25 years ago I learned it from hearing it sung to the later verses of Psalm 118 at the Associated Presbyterian Church in Inverness.
    Psalm 62:1-6, a beautiful harmonic recording at a Psalm sing organised by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.
    Psalm 71: 1-5, Track  19 from Trinity Presbyterian Reformed Church (Des Moines) Psalm CDs Vol 2
    Psalm 90:10-17, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 130: Sheffield (104 in Sing Psalms, 130 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 68:32-35, an older choir recording, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 22: 22-26, from a Psalm sing organised by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.

  • 131: Southwark (105 in Sing Psalms, 129 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 135: 1-5, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 18: 1-7, from John Ross-10 and co.

  • 132: Southwell (not in Sing Psalms, 130 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 24:1-6
    Psalm 126: 1-6, both from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Is anyone else apart from CCRPC singing this?  It sounds a nice tune but I don’t recall having heard it before!

  • 133: Spohr (not in Sing Psalms, 131 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 91:1-6, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina.
    Psalm 126, by young people at a camp reunion

  • 134: Stockton (not in Sing Psalms, 132 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    There are two recordings of this tune on CCRPC’s site (Psalms 37:35-40 and 138:5-8), but at least the fourth line is not the same as in the Scottish Psalmody.
    Midi at Grace Reformed Church Aberdeen and Small Church Music, and Michael-Hubert Lamla on Youtube (especially the second part of this clip)

  • 135: Stornoway (106 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 13: 2-6, from the 1976 Glasgow Psalmody Recital tape “Joy in Psalms”.
    Psalm 69: 14-18, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina.
    Psalm 69: 1-4, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina, uploaded to KetchamRP’s Soundcloud profile
    This tune, attributed to John Matheson of Bragar, is one that is used in the Gaelic tradition, as heard for instance here: Psalm 72: 18, 19 (FCC, Scalpay).

  • 136: Stracathro (107 in Sing Psalms, 133 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 34: 1-10, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Psalm 72: 14-17, from a Psalm sing organised by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.  The child’s voice finally gets closer to time by the last two verses!
    Some of the other recordings that I found online either seemed low and dragging, or else screeching when they hit the high notes.  I guess this one is difficult to do well.

  • 137: Stroudwater (108 in Sing Psalms, 134 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 9, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 93, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 138: Tallis [Tallis’ Ordinal]  (109 in Sing Psalms, 135 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 1, from a Psalm sing organised by folk from the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Santa Fe, Texas.
    Psalm 105:16-23, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Psalm 78: 1-4, an older psalmody choral recording on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 139: Tiverton (110 in Sing Psalms, 136 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 138: 1-3, from the RPC of Ireland Northern Presbytery Choir cassette “Scottish Metrical Psalms” RP SC 4
    Psalm 8, uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile

  • 140: Torwood (111 in Sing Psalms, not in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This psalm tune is popular in the Gaelic tradition and is therefore often sung with extra notes beyond those printed, with variations from church to church and even perhaps from person to person within a congregation.  Two examples sung as printed:
    Psalm 57: 1-3, an older psalmody choir recording, no doubt either Free Church or RPCI.
    Psalm 35: 13-17, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina, uploaded to KetchamRP’s Soundcloud profile.
    And a version taken to Texas from Scottish Free Presbyterian congregations: Psalm 107: 23-30.

  • 141: University (not in Sing Psalms, 137 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 48 (Sing Psalms), uploaded to Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile
    I chose this recording because it appears accurate to the printed music in the Scottish Psalmody, and the singing flows well.

  • 142: Walsall (112 in Sing Psalms, 139 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 71: 9-13, from John Ross-10 and co.
    Psalm 51: 9-15, from Greenville Presbyterian Church (Free Church of Scotland – Continuing) in South Carolina, uploaded to KetchamRP’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 143: Warwick (113 in Sing Psalms, 140 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 18: 28-29, 31-32, 35, from Dowanvale, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 57: 7-11, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

  • 144: Westminster (115 in Sing Psalms, 141 in Sing Psalms)
    Psalm 2, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.
    Psalm 73: 12-20, also from CCRPC.

  • 145: Wetherby (116 in Sing Psalms, 142 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 73: 23-26, uploaded to YouTube by David Murray
    Psalm 63, from Christ Covenant Reformed Presbyterian Church, Wylie, Texas.

  • 146: Wigtown (117 in Sing Psalms, 143 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 32: 1-5, from the 1976 Glasgow Psalmody Recital tape “Joy in Psalms”.
    Psalm 21:8-13, from John Ross-10 and co.

  • 147: Wiltshire (118 in Sing Psalms, 144 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    Psalm 46: 7-11, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 73: 23-26, from a gathering at Castlewellan in 2012.

  • 148: Winchester (119 in Sing Psalms, 145 in Scottish Psalter 1929)
    This is “Winchester Old” – we also have “Winchester New”, a Long Metre tune, in The Scottish Psalmody under the name “Crasselius”.
    Winchester Old is now universally associated in the United Kingdom with Nahum Tate’s hymn or scripture paraphrase “While Shepherds Watched their Flocks by Night” which appeared in a supplement to Tate and Brady’s Psalter, so for those outside of a psalm-singing background it can be a surprise to find it widely used in Psalm-singing Scottish churches.  The tune appeared in Este’s Psalter in 1592, a century or so before the publication of “While Shepherds”, and some claim that the association with those words only arose in the 19th century.
    Psalm 89: 31-38, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.
    Psalm 24: 3-8 (Sing Psalms), from Dowanvale Free Church.

  • 149: York (120 in Sing Psalms, 146 in Scottish Psalter 1929)One of the “twelve tunes” issued in Aberdeen in 1666 to accompany the 1650 Scottish Psalter (which had been issued without music).  Like most of these, it may no longer be universally familiar in psalm-singing circles in Scotland.
    Psalm 2, on Connor Quigley’s Soundcloud profile.

    END of Common Metre tunes in Scottish Psalmody. After these there are 9 Double Common Metre tunes to be sung with double length verses, or two verses together.  Other editions of the 1650 psalter  (e.g. Scottish Psalter 1929, RPCI Psalter) will contain other tunes that may be familiar.
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